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Still image from "Making Montgomery Clift" film, showing a circular viewfinder with images of the actor standing against a red-planked wall

Pitt Faculty Members' “Making Montgomery Clift” Wins Documentary Feature Award

The documentary “Making Montgomery Clift,” directed by Pitt assistant professor of film and media studies Robert Clift and his wife, senior lecturer Hillary Demmon, has been honored by the University Film & Video Association (UFVA).

The film won the Silver Award in the Documentary Feature category at the UFVA 73rd Conference Award Ceremony, held recently at Augsburg University in Minneapolis.

“It was a great honor to have the film recognized by my academic peers,” said Clift, the legendary actor’s nephew, of the UFVA event. 

Clift and Demmon have spent the last year screening the documentary at film festivals around the globe. It has played at more than 50 venues, including at a packed house at San Francisco’s Castro Theatre during Frameline 43, one of the largest LGBTQ+ film exhibition events in the world.

The film now heading to streaming and on-demand services, and the film’s Facebook page contains updates on how and when to watch.

Decorative gate inside Commons Room of the Cathedral of Learning, arches of hallway in background

Pitt Innovation Challenge Awards $460,000 for Novel Health Care Solutions

$460,000 in prizes were awarded at the 2019 Pitt Innovation Challenge (PInCh) final event, where University of Pittsburgh research teams proposed creative solutions to a live audience and a panel of judges to address important health problems.

After two rounds of pre-selection, 14 project teams were invited to the final event where six finalists — each competing for a $100,000 prize — and eight finalists competed in a poster session for $25,000 prizes. 

This year, the Clinical and Translational Science Institute, the challenge's sponsor, incentivized solutions for problems known to impact rural health disparities by offering an additional bonus award up to $25,000.    

$100,000 awards:  

  • OneValve: A self-regenerating heart valve that uses the patient’s natural healing process to replace diseased heart valves, decreasing the risk of blood clots and improving durability over current therapy.
  • HIV Detective: A “one-minute” HIV test that can detect infection at the point of patient contact with health care providers.
  • CyteSolutions Lens: A silicone-hydrogel-based contact lens that has been coated with natural biopolymers containing an immune modifying drug for the treatment of dry eye disease.

The Clinical and Translational Science Institute website shows the full list of winners and project descriptions.

Holger Hoock headshot

Dietrich School Awarded $1.5 Million Grant to Transform Doctoral Education in the Humanities

The Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh has been awarded a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support a transformation of doctoral education in the humanities.

The four-year, $1.5 million grant will fund Humanities Engage, a comprehensive plan to prepare doctoral students to become scholar-leaders ready to pursue high-impact careers within and beyond a changing academy. The grant will foster an ongoing culture change as programs, faculty and graduate students embrace the full spectrum of postdoctoral humanistic careers.

“The support from the Mellon Foundation will help us prepare our graduate students to face challenges in an interconnected yet divided world,” said Kathleen Blee, Bettye J. and Ralph E. Bailey Dean of the Dietrich School. “Validating these diverse career outcomes is a vital part of transforming the culture of humanistic doctoral education.”

The grant will support significant curricular change and the creation of an immersive fellowship program, including funded summer fellowships across the non-profit, public and corporate sectors.

The initiative will also support a new position of director of graduate advising and engagement to modernize cultures of mentoring.

“I’m very excited about the immense potential of this novel position to help us model the benefits of expansively team-based mentoring,” said Holger Hoock, associate dean for graduate studies and research and J. Carroll Amundson Chair of British History in the Dietrich School.

Hoock, who is also principal investigator of the initiative, added, “The director will help advise PhD students on their professional development, support their evolving career aspirations and connect them with opportunities across the campus, city and region as well with our alums. They will serve, too, as a resource to the graduate faculty as we reimagine the broader importance of humanities PhDs and the societal impacts of humanistic training.

Humanities Engage builds on the Mellon-supported Collecting Knowledge Pittsburgh project (2015-19) and Humanities Careers, which was funded by a Next Generation Humanities PhD planning grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The initiative also benefits from the Public Humanities Fellows Program piloted by the Humanities Center, which created opportunities for graduate students in local arts and cultural institutions.

Ann E. Cudd

U.N. Forum Focuses on Pittsburgh as Leader in Advancing Sustainable Development Goals

A forum during the 74th United Nations General Assembly featured Ann E. Cudd, Pitt’s provost and senior vice chancellor, along with Pittsburgh Mayor William Peduto and other local leaders who highlighted regional accomplishments to advance Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for a more peaceful, prosperous planet with fair and inclusive societies.

The efforts were summarized Sept. 23 in New York City during a “Spotlight on Pittsburgh” panel discussion to showcase the best of American leadership and innovation to achieve the SDGs. The goals were adopted by the U.N. General Assembly in 2015 after years of discussion and input from millions of people — especially young people — around the world. The SDGs include 17 global goals to realize “The Future We Want.”

Provost Cudd and Mayor Peduto were joined by James Garrett, provost and chief academic officer of Carnegie Mellon University; David Finegold, president of Chatham University; and Lisa Schroeder, president and CEO of The Pittsburgh Foundation.

Pitt’s highlighted commitments included: the Millennium Fellowship, with 14 students selected for this United Nations Academic Impact/MCN program who will focus on SDG projects; two Community Engagement Centers established in partnership with residents and stakeholders in traditionally underserved Pittsburgh neighborhoods where the University has made long-term commitments of investment, infrastructure, programming and staffing; and the Pitt Success Program to expand access and affordability through a new financial aid program that has already dramatically increased the percentage of Pell students.

“The University of Pittsburgh is proud to work together with city leadership and our neighboring universities to advance a common and powerful commitment to participate in active, effective and transformative efforts framed by the UN Sustainable Development Goals — all meant to benefit our students, our region, and the world,” said Cudd.

Read more about the United Nations General Assembly forum on the Office of the Provost’s website.

Cayla Ray headshot

Cayla Ray to Receive Young Alumni Leadership Award

Pitt-Greensburg (UPG) alumna Cayla Ray has been named the recipient of the 2019 Pitt-Greensburg Alumni Association Young Alumni Leadership Award. The honor recognizes established and future leaders age 35 and younger who have distinguished themselves among their peers and in their profession, community and/or at the University.

Ray, a native of Derry, Pennsylvania, graduated with a major in biological science and a minor in psychology from UPG in 2014. She earned a doctor of dental medicine and a certificate in dental public health from the Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health and is currently serving her pediatric dental residency at Primary Children’s Hospital in Salt Lake City, Utah.

At UPG, Ray cofounded the campus’ Pre-Health Committee, developed unique guidebooks for entrance into various health programs and organized study groups for MCAT, DAT and GRE admissions tests. She also served as a commuter mentor, and was president and vice president of the campus chapter of Beta Beta Beta biology honor society. She volunteered at The End Hunger Café, serving food, creating a bimonthly clothing closet and organizing a back-to-school fundraiser for three underserved families.

Ray was a UPG Female Scholar-Athlete of the Year and an NCAA Woman of the Year in recognition of her outstanding community service and grades within the NCAA Division III.

Said Ray, “To this day, I still connect with many of my mentors, professors and coaches from Pitt-Greensburg, and I truly can't thank them enough for their commitment to my success and longterm camaraderie. I am confident that Pitt-Greensburg helped me develop the foundation for a successful future and I am honored to share in those achievements as my academic and professional journey continues."  

Paul Cohen headshot

Pitt’s Newest School Builds Its Expertise With New Faculty

The School of Computing and Information (SCI), established in 2017, SCI is Pitt’s first new school in 20 years – and has a focus on interdisciplinary collaboration and modeling to solve global issues.

New faculty members with backgrounds vital to building the school’s expertise have recently joined the school.

“SCI is very excited to welcome 18 new faculty,” said Paul Cohen, founding dean. “Each faculty member has a deep understanding of cross-disciplinary collaboration and a commitment to furthering SCI’s mission of making the world a better place through polymathic education and the science of interacting systems.”

SCI welcomed the following faculty at the start of the fall 2019 term:

  • Wonsun Ahn, visiting lecturer. Ahn obtained his PhD in computer science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is a Samsung Frontier founding member. His research interests include computer architecture, compiler optimization, scripting languages, speculative parallelization and parallel computing.
  • Katharine Anderson, visiting assistant professor. Anderson models and analyzes the structure, formation and dynamics of scientific collaboration networks, skill diversity and synergy and the complexities of human capital. She earned her PhD in economics from the University of Michigan in 2010.
  • Amy Babay, assistant professor. Babay’s research focuses on modeling and designing new internet services with demanding performance requirements and on building dependable critical infrastructure systems. Babay received her PhD in computer science from Johns Hopkins University in 2018.
  • Jacob Biehl, associate professor. Biehl comes to Pitt after a decade with FX Palo Alto Laboratory, Fuji Xerox’s computer science research laboratory in Silicon Valley, California. He earned his PhD in computer science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2008.
  • Seong Jae Hwang, assistant professor. Hwang’s research areas include medical imaging, computer vision and machine learning with an emphasis on modeling disease progression. He earned his PhD in computer science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2019.
  • Stephen Lee, assistant professor. His research interests span several areas of computer systems, including distributed systems and cyber-physical systems, with an emphasis on domains such as smart cities, smart buildings and transportation. He earned his PhD in computer science from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 2019.
  • Eleanor “Nora” Mattern (SCI 14G), teaching assistant professor. Mattern returns to Pitt, where she earned her PhD, after serving as a librarian at the University of Chicago. Prior, she held a joint visiting position with the University Library System’s Digital Scholarship Services and SCI at Pitt. With SCI, she previously taught courses in preservation, archival ethics and metadata and archival access systems and developed experiential learning projects.
  • Luis de Oliveira, visiting lecturer. Oliveira graduated from the University of Porto, Portugal, with a PhD in 2016, with a thesis focused on wireless communications and localization for small teams of mobile robots. His current research interests are the preservation of reproducible software execution, real time communication protocols for teams of mobile agents and anchorless localization using RF signals.
  • Song Shi, visiting assistant professor. Shi’s research includes examining new media interventions for development and social change initiated by activists, NGOs and the government as detailed in his monograph “China and the Internet: Using New Media for Development in Social Change.” Shi received his PhD in communication and media studies from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 2013.
  • Xulong Tang, assistant professor. Tang’s research interests include modeling and designing high-performance computing and parallel computer architectures and systems. He earned his PhD in computer engineering from the Pennsylvania State University in 2019.
  • Lingfei Wu, assistant professor. Wu is a computational social scientist whose current research aims at unleashing the power of artificial neural network techniques to overcome cognitive and social constraints of human knowledge creation. Additionally, Wu co-founded one of the largest non-governmental science associations in China, which is the incubator of three million-dollar AI startups in self-driving, natural language processing and urban planning.
  • Joseph Yurko, teaching assistant professor. Yurko’s background spans both machine learning and traditional engineering applications. He comes to Pitt from Arconic, a manufacturing company, where he served as a data scientist. He earned his PhD in nuclear engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Additional faculty who joined SCI in the last academic year:

  • Kayla Booth, research assistant professor. Her research interests include diversity and social inclusion, social and health informatics, and social media. She obtained her PhD from Pennsylvania State University.
  • Matt Burton, lecturer. Burton was previously a visiting assistant professor at SCI before becoming a lecturer. His research interests focus on infrastructure studies, data science, and scholarly communication. He holds a PhD in information from the University of Michigan.
  • Timothy Hoffman, lecturer. Hoffman is a former corporate trainer for software development and former assistant teaching professor at Carnegie Mellon University. His interests center on developing software tools to streamline the grading and administrative aspects of course management- along with tools to assist department researchers working on issues such as early identification of struggling students, tools for tutoring and remedial work for struggling students and the gathering of meta data relating to pedagogy.
  • Vinicius Petrucci, lecturer. Petrucci was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, San Diego, and at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. He obtained his PhD in computer science at Fluminese Federal University in 2012. He is a member of ACM.
  • Marcia Rapchak, lecturer. Rapchak’s research interests span multiple areas and include information literacy, academic libraries, computer-supported collaborative learning and critical librarianship. She obtained her EdD from Duquesne University and has several recent publications. Rapchak is the 2018 recipient of the Routledge Distance Learning Librarianship Conference Sponsorship Award.
  • Erin Walker, associate professor. Walker completed in PhD in 2010 at Carnegie Mellon University in Human-Computer interaction. Her research uses interdisciplinary methods to improve the design and implementation of educational technology and then to understand when and why it is effective.

 

Headshot of  Dana Thompson Dorsey

Center for Urban Education to House Educational Researcher Journal

The Center for Urban Education (CUE) within the School of Education has been selected as the new home institution of the academic journal Educational Researcher

Educational Researcher is a publication of the American Educational Research Association. One of the journal’s goals is to “make major programmatic research and new findings of broad importance widely accessible.”

Dana Thompson Dorsey, CUE’s associate director of research and development, will be one of the journal’s five senior editors situated across the country. CUE director T. Elon Dancy II will serve as associate editor, along with Jennifer Russell, assistant professor of Learning Sciences and Policy and research scientist at the Learning Research and Development center (LRDC), and Lindsay Page, assistant professor of research methodology and research scientist at the LRDC.

The Center for Urban Education will house the journal from 2019 to 2022. It is customary for the assignments to rotate every three years among the top schools of education.

Cathedral of Learning against a blue sky with streaks of clouds.

Hesselbein Global Academy Celebrates 11th Year

A flagship event for the Office of Cross Cultural and Leadership Development (CCLD), the Hesselbein Global Academy gathered 42 delegates from 12 countries and 11 U.S. states this summer for an intensive learning and civic engagement experience at the University of Pittsburgh.

“In addition to hosting the 2019 Hesselbein Student Leadership Summit [at the Pittsburgh campus], we also hosted an academy alumni reunion dinner in New York in August,” said Sarah Popovich, assistant director of leadership education in CCLD. “The reunion dinner brought together alumni from the past 11 Summits. It was incredible to hear stories from the alumni about how the academy has played an important role in their leadership journeys.” To date, the academy boasts over 500 global alumni.

Read some stories of this year’s Global Academy and learn about the woman it’s named for, Frances Hesselbein, a Pitt alumna and recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, which is the United States’ highest civilian honor. 

David Birnbaum headshot, Kathryn Haines headshot

Two From Pitt Receive Grants from National Endowment for the Humanities

The National Endowment for the Humanities granted awards to two Pitt professionals for their work in the following categories: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities and  Landmarks of American History. 

David J. Birnbaum, professor and chair of the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures within the Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, was awarded an Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities Grant from NEH.  The award of $249,456 will support “Advanced Digital Editing: Modeling the Text and Making the Edition,” a two-week summer institute on the theory and development of digital scholarly editions.

Kathryn Haines, associate director of the Center for American Music within the University Library System, received a Landmarks of American History Grant of $169,803 to support “The Homestead Steel Strike and the Growth of America as an Industrial Power,” a two one-week workshops for K-12 educators.

Birnbaum and Haines’ awards were part of $29 million total in grants to fund 215 humanities projects and programs across the country to “support vital research, education, preservation and public programs in the humanities.”

headshot of Toi Derricotte

Professor Emerita Receives Award from Modern Language Association

Toi Derricotte, professor emerita in the Department of English within the Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, has been recognized by the Modern Language Association (MLA) with its Phyllis Franklin Award for Public Advocacy of the Humanities.

Derricotte received the award along with her colleague Cornelius Eady, with whom she co-founded Cave Canem, a national poetry organization that cultivates “the artistic and professional growth of African American poets.”

“The contributions that Toi Derricotte and Cornelius Eady have made in African American and African Diasporic poetry are immeasurable. Their visionary work at the Cave Canem Foundation helped open doors once difficult to access for black poets.” said Dawn Lundy Martin, director of the Center for African American Poetry and Poetics.

“Derricotte made Pitt the beacon for African American poetry and poetics that it is today, and we remain grateful for her lasting contributions —a gratitude that remains visible in our having a chair in poetry named in her honor,” said Gayle Rogers, chair of the Department of English.

The namesake of the award, Phyllis Franklin, served as MLA’s executive director from 1985 until 2002. Derricotte will be presented with the award at a ceremony in January.

headshot of Maureen Porter, wearing black, blue and white patterned blouse

Education Professor Receives Outstanding International Educator Award

Maureen Porter, associate professor in the School of Education, received the David Portlock Outstanding International Educator Award.

The award is given by the Pennsylvania Council of International Education and recognizes international educators “who have exhibited evidence of ongoing mentoring of colleagues in the field, exemplary leadership in international education on their campuses and consistent contribution to the field as seen in presentations, papers, publications or other academic enterprises.”

Porter, who has developed education projects around the world in countries including Bolivia and Ethiopia, said the award is an honor because it recognizes how her programs have been sustained for many years.

“It shows that people can look to the School of Education as a destination for pedagogically sound and culturally inclusive international education programs,” she said.

Iron gate inside the Cathedral of Learning, neo-Gothic arches in background

Fourteen Pitt Students Named 2019 Millennium Fellows

Fourteen Pitt students are among the 1,092 students on 69 campuses worldwide who form the 2019 cohort of Millennium Fellows. They are Scott Glaser, Leah Graham, Madhura Leninkannan, Devesh Malik, Katelyn Morrison, Jasmin Perrier, Luke Persin, Benjamin Raymond, Anisha Reddy, Chiara Rigaud, Zachary Ryckman, Sophie Tayade, Nadine Vandevender and Rhea Verma.

This term-long leadership development program takes place on selected campuses worldwide, convening, challenging and celebrating student leadership that advances the United Nations’ 17  Sustainable Development Goals. Millennium Fellows' projects are expected to positively impact the lives of over 978,400 people worldwide this year. 

Read more on the Pitt cohort.

Millennium Campus Network partners with the United Nations Academic Impact to support Millennium Fellowship student leadership. 

“On every campus and in every community, student leaders are committed to making positive contributions while committed to our ethos: empathetic, humble, inclusive leadership,” said Sam Vaghar, executive director and co-founder of Millennium Campus Network.

Gelsy Torres-Oviedo headshot in blue jacket.

Bioengineering Researcher Gelsy Torres-Oviedo Awarded Grant to Study Stroke Patients

Gelsy Torres-Oviedo, assistant professor of bioengineering in Pitt’s Swanson School of Engineering, recently received a $805,670 CAREER Award by the National Science Foundation to apply a novel approach to improve locomotor learning in stroke patients. 

Torres-Oviedo’s lab will record how patients with brain lesions perceive asymmetries in their gait, then measure how their perception is adjusted once their movements are adapted in the split-belt environment. In the second part of this study, the lab will use these data and a unique method to manipulate how people perceive their movement to create the illusion of error-free performance during split-belt walking. The goal is for patients to sustain these movement changes in daily life.

The project also aims to increase participation by underrepresented minorities (URM) in science and engineering. 

Two students walking on campus with sun shining between them, silhouetted

Pitt Expands Access to Students With Financial Need by Joining American Talent Initiative

The University of Pittsburgh has joined the American Talent Initiative (ATI), an alliance of 120 four-year institutions united in a goal of enrolling, supporting and graduating 50,000 additional talented, lower-income students by 2025.

“The question of whether or not the University of Pittsburgh should join the American Talent Initiative ended in an enthusiastic yes,” said Chancellor Patrick Gallagher. “It shares our commitment to graduating — and not just enrolling — exceptional students. And it aligns seamlessly with our ever-evolving suite of access and affordability efforts, which aim to connect more deserving students and families with a world-class Pitt education.” 

This is the University’s eighth initiative since 2014 focused on enhancing access to Pitt. Members of ATI convene regularly to share best practices and data and also will contribute to research that aims to enhance support for students from lower-income backgrounds.

Pitt is one of only 320 institutions in the United States to meet ATI’s eligibility criteria, which require institutions to graduate at least 70% of their students in six years. This constitutes less than 8% of the approximately 4,200 higher education institutions in the country.

Earlier this year, the University launched its seventh initiative — Pitt Success — which matches federal Pell Grant support dollar-for-dollar and is the only program of its kind in the nation.

“In joining the American Talent Initiative, I am very excited that we will be able to collaborate closely with institutions that share our deep commitment to educational access and equity,” said Provost and Senior Vice Chancellor Ann E. Cudd. “We are eager to contribute to discussions with our peers in ATI so that, working together, we can address this critically important challenge in lasting ways.”

women riding bicycle

First-ever partnership brings free bike share rides to Pitt first-year students

The University of Pittsburgh is partnering with the Healthy Ride bike share program to introduce first-year students to bicycling as a mode of transit around Pitt’s campus and the city of Pittsburgh.

All first-year undergraduate students and resident assistants at Pitt receive unlimited 30-minute rides with Healthy Ride during the academic year 2019–20 Fall and Spring terms. The pilot program, offered through Pitt’s Office of Sustainability, is the first of its kind in Pittsburgh.

“We are excited to be the first university to partner with Healthy Ride to offer this benefit,” said Aurora Sharrard, Pitt's director of sustainability. “Sustainability is an important part of our campus culture and this is an exciting way for our first-year students to begin their own Pitt sustainability journey.”

A recent expansion of bike lanes and bike facilities has made bicycling throughout Oakland and the surrounding neighborhoods safer and more accessible.

“There are a lot of places students can get in 30 minutes, and bikes are a great way to get to know a new city,” said David White, executive director, Pittsburgh Bike Share. “We are eager to see how students make the most of their Healthy Ride memberships and incorporate short bike trips into their transit routine.”

Healthy Ride operates 112 stations and 650 bikes across over 24 neighborhoods in Pittsburgh. It marked record ridership in 2019 and anticipates an additional increase as a result of the pilot program with the University of Pittsburgh.

M. Najeeb Shafiq headshot in sportcoat, shirt and tie

School of Education to Serve as New Home Base for International Society

The School of Education now serves as the new home base of the Comparative and International Education Society, following the recent appointment of M. Najeeb Shafiq as executive director. Shafiq, who serves as professor of education, economics and international affairs at Pitt, holds appointments in the School of Education, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs and the Department of Economics.

According to its website, the society “organizes and provides conferences, publications, professional networking and research support for the field of comparative and international education,” and represents members “from over 1,000 universities, research institutes, government departments, non-governmental organizations and multilateral agencies.”

As the new home institution of the society, the School of Education is poised to have greater exposure to the study of global issues in education, Shafiq said. The school is expected to host events with significant leaders in the field, including the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, the Economic Policy Institute, the RAND Corporation and the American Institutes for Research.

Nancy M.K. Merritt headshot, wearing navy blue blazer

Merritt Named Vice Chancellor for Alumni Relations

Nancy M.K. Merritt has joined the University of Pittsburgh as vice chancellor for alumni relations, bringing 17 years of experience to her new role along with plans to develop programs to help alumni to engage with students, pursue educational and professional opportunities and enrich their personal and career networks.

She most recently was assistant vice president for alumni relations at Carnegie Mellon University and previously spent 13 years in alumni relations at Lehigh University, where she directed student, young alumni, outreach and reunion programs before going on to serve as the director of the Lehigh University Alumni Association. Merritt holds two degrees from Lehigh: a bachelor of arts in journalism and communications and a master’s in political science.

Read more about Merritt in this Pitt Alumni Association post.

Female student in a red shirt typing on computer keyboard with monitor facing her

Pitt Institute for Cyber Law, Policy, and Security Holds Successful Third Annual Cyber Camp

On July 26, the University of Pittsburgh Institute for Cyber Law, Policy, and Security (Pitt Cyber), wrapped up its third annual Air Force Association Cyber Camp, a five-day intensive cybersecurity training for high school students. This year, 213 students from high schools in Pennsylvania and nine other states attended the camp to learn cybersecurity basics, such as protecting personal information online, or for advanced skills such as networking and operations security in Windows and Ubuntu. In this year’s cohort, 43 percent of students identifed as nonwhite and an all-female team took home the top prize during team-based IT skills competitions.

Ryad Benosman and Feng Xiong headshots.

Pitt Researchers to Create Vision System Mimicking Human Sight

New research from the University of Pittsburgh will develop a neuromorphic vision system that takes a new approach to capturing visual information that is based on the human brain, benefiting everything from self-driving vehicles to neural prosthetics.

The project will receive $500,000 from the National Science Foundation. Ryad Benosman, professor of ophthalmology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine who holds appointments in electrical engineering and bioengineering, and Feng Xiong, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the Swanson School of Engineering, are leading the effort.

The team will use a “spiking neural network” with realistic dynamic synapses that will enhance computational abilities, develop brain-inspired machine learning to understand the input, and connect it to a neuromorphic event-based silicon retina for real-time operating vision.

Piervincenzo Rizzo wearing a black top, headshot

Swanson School’s Piervincenzo Rizzo to Receive Durelli Award

The Society for Experimental Mechanics has selected Piervincenzo Rizzo, professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Pittsburgh’s Swanson School of Engineering, to receive the 2020 A.J. Durelli Award

The award recognizes “a young professional who has introduced, or helped to introduce, an innovative approach and/or method into the field of experimental mechanics,” according to the society.

The award will be presented at an Awards Luncheon on June 10, 2020, during the SEM Annual Conference and Exposition on Experimental and Applied Mechanics in Orlando, Florida.