Alumni

Frank Ning
Increasingly, universities are looking to their alumni in China for help creating important international links, and for the University of Pittsburgh, that effort is being bolstered by one key graduate.
Jess Edelstein
Sick of stains, Jess Edelstein (A&S ’11) invented a new activated-charcoal deodorant product — and made a successful pitch on ABC’s “Shark Tank” to expand its distribution.
"Woman on Fire," a film by alumna Julie Sokolow, paints a portrait of change in the American family and workplace with the story of Brooke Guinan, the first openly transgender woman in the New York City Fire Department.
Pitt alumni Erikah Abdu and Richard Dodge
Erikah Abdu (BUS ’10) and Richard Dodge (A&S ’95), social director and president of the Houston Pitt Club, found ways to personally lend their support to friends, neighbors and strangers affected by the massive storm.
Adam Haritan
Adam Haritan, a wild-food enthusiast and researcher, leads educational walks, offers presentations on topics such as Mushrooms of the Fall and sells his own handcrafted wild plant- and mushroom-based supplements.
D'Cruz in a maroon tie, white shirt and black suit
As a volunteer with Doctors Without Borders, alumnus Brian D'Cruz has treated trauma patients in Chad, Republic of the Congo and the Central African Republic. In 2013, he headed to Syria.
woman smiling
Inspirational stories of pioneering lives highlighted Pitt's African American Alumni Council ceremony in June, during which five alumni were honored with the Distinguished Alumnus Award.
Doctor-turned-state-senator and School of Medicine alumnus Richard Pan discusses the importance of "herd immunity" amidst public concerns and misconceptions about vaccines.
Pisarcik
First-generation college student Susan Pisarcik is one of just 10 honorees from the United States. The award will pay for a fieldwork project where she will study the refugee population in rural Germany.
woman blowing out birthday candles
Vivian Davidson Hewitt (SIS '44), the first African-American librarian at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, has spent decades amassing one of the premiere collections of African-American artwork in the world.