Innovation & Research

Mike Schneider examines a model human spine
More than 40 percent of low back pain patients are prescribed opioids at some point. Pitt Associate Professor Mike Schneider and colleagues want to bring that number down.
Scientist greets a visitor at science event
The annual celebration of science and technology at the University of Pittsburgh is an opportunity for science professionals and aficionados alike to discover new research, network with colleagues and discuss topics affecting the scientific community.
Finkel in a dark suitcoat
With new director Toren Finkel, Pitt's Aging Institute is expanding its approach to improving people's "health span" — the period of life during which a person remains free from serious illness. 
Libertus in a brown shirt and her 2-year-old Linus, playing with toys in a beige room
Assistant professor of psychology Melissa Libertus has always loved math — and she's working to help more children and adults love it, too.
The Brookings Institution reports that the University of Pittsburgh and neighboring entities form the core of a naturally occurring innovation district.
Cooper in a dark jacket smiling into the camera
Rory Cooper, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences professor and founding director of the Human Engineering Research Laboratories, has been honored with what's known as the "Oscar award for government service" for his innovative wheelchairs and assistive technologies.
young man in a white shirt using a blue and black PneuChair
Pitt-developed wheelchairs powered by compressed air made a splash at a Texas water park for people with disabilities over the summer, with "thousands of inquiries" resulting from its success.
The Pitt-Paris agreement will enable closer collaboration on research to treat optic nerve problems and age-related eye conditions.
a pale arm with spots from poison oak
Engineer Steven Little and colleagues may have found the cell-sized source of irritation caused by contact with allergens.
illustration with bees on the left and a model of particles on the right
Engineer Anna Balazs has modeled behavior in nonliving particles which could lead to advancements in the construction of robots from highly flexible materials similar to those found in living organisms.