Innovation & Research

Riley and Todd Wolynn standing in front of a body of water
Undergrad Riley Wolynn and her father Todd Wolynn (MED '92) teamed up to study misinformation surrounding vaccines online.
A vaccine bottle on a table with a blue gloved hand holding a syringe in the background
What can vaccine proponents, clinicians and public health communicators learn from anti-vaxxers? A lot, say Pitt researchers. See what they suggest.
A person in a face shield looks at purple lab samples
On the 66th anniversary of the Salk polio vaccine being declared safe and effective, Pitt premieres a new film, “Chasing Covid,” that draws parallels between that event and Pitt’s current global collaboration on vaccine research.
Eric Roberts in a checkered shirt and dark suit jacket
Scientists in the Graduate School of Public Health found that people just out of poverty face disproportionately high medical bills. Eric T. Roberts and colleagues offer four possible fixes for the problem.
Ho in a blue and pink plaid shirt holding a testing kit
Pitt is one of 15 sites that will survey area residents to learn who has antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 and who is carrying the virus at the time of the test.
Two people in face masks looking at a desktop monitor
And why do we need to do more of it to track coronavirus variants and end the pandemic? Pitt’s Alexander Sundermann, Lee Harison and Vaughn Cooper explain in The Conversation.
Amin Rahimian against trees in the background
A study co-led by Pitt’s Amin Rahimian found that people are more likely to get a COVID-19 vaccine if they’re told that others are.
A man in an orange tie and white shirt on a rooftop holding a 3-D model in his fingers
CBS chief medical correspondent Jon LaPook traveled to Pitt’s Center for Vaccine Research to better understand coronavirus variants.
A bee on a white flower
The economic value of insect pollinators such as honeybees and butterflies is a whopping $34 billion, a recent Pitt study found.
A person making a heart with their hands around a baby's feet
A national study led by Pitt and NYU has found the Smart Beginnings Project with videotaping and a family coach significantly improves parenting of children growing up in poverty.