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an illustration of the virus
The University of Pittsburgh continues to monitor the spread of the coronavirus disease, COVID-19, and is taking steps to respond to community needs.
Gertrude Wade in a black and white photo.
Gertrude Wade (EDUC ’44, ’46G) helped break the color barrier in Pittsburgh by landing the job as the first African American female principal in Pittsburgh Public Schools.
Stephanie Adams, dean of the Eric Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Texas at Dallas, shared the story of her career path with Pitt students, faculty and staff during a lecture in honor of Black History Month.
Stephanie Adams of the University of Texas at Dallas didn’t follow a straightforward path to become a university dean. She shared her story with members of the Swanson School of Engineering community on Feb. 25. For Pitt engineering students like Isreal Williams, who is himself a mentor to high school students, hearing stories of unusual journeys to success is vital.
Ella P. Stewart
In addition to making history at Pitt, Ella P. Stewart (PHARM 1916) was the first Black woman pharmacist licensed in Pennsylvania, as well as one of the first Black women licensed to practice pharmacy in the United States.
An Olympic medal from 1936
The 1936 Berlin Olympic Games were famous for Jesse Owens’ sweeping victories, but did you know that Pitt shares in the history too? A 21-year-old runner named John Woodruff (A&S ’39) paused mid-race and still managed to win the 800 meter competition. Pitt has his gold medal.
the Day of Giving logo, which features a Cathedral
On Tuesday, Feb. 25, alumni, students, parents, friends, faculty and staff are invited to come together and support Pitt. It’s easy to make a gift to the area that matters most to you.
Perry Jones in a red armchair in a dark blue suit with a white shirt and blue striped tie.
Though Perry Jones (ENGR ’59) encountered discrimination on his way to becoming a pilot, encouragement from his grandfather kept him going.
Kayla Scoggin in front of a light green wall, in a black shirt.
Kayla Scoggin, a 21-year old urban studies major, will enter service with the Peace Corps in Uganda upon graduation this spring. Her internship through the Elsie Hillman Civic Forum helped prepare her for her new role.
The KanKouran West African Dance Company dancing on stage in bright yellow and orange attire.
Born of a lunchtime conversation among three women faculty members and sponsored by multiple units on campus, the upcoming “Black to the Future” festival will showcase artistic talent, resilience and innovation.
Jeremy Levy in a striped blue dress shirt
Most people are familiar with solid, liquid, gas and plasma, but there are other states of matter too. Jeremy Levy and Patrick Irvin of Pitt recently uncovered an electronic state that adds to the field’s understanding of quantum physics.
Tony Fountain
Coming from a family that cherished education, Tony Fountain (A&S '70) is demonstrating what it looks like to empower the educators who teach the next generation.
A depiction of a coronavirus
While identifying a new disease by its place of origin seems intuitive, history demonstrates that doing so can harm the people who live there, contends Pitt historian Mari Webel.
Josh Gibson sliding home in a baseball uniform
For The Conversation, Professor Rob Ruck detailed a brief history of the Negro Leagues, the integration of Major League Baseball and how Pittsburgh played an influential role in the new face of the game.
Tyler Bray (left) and Jacob Meadows (right) bioengineering seniors in Pitt’s Swanson School of Engineering, in blue Pitt jackets, sitting at a table with their Posture Protect vest on top.
Posture Protect doesn’t just help users sit up straight—it could help people with Parkinson’s disease avoid falls. The student innovation effort that started in Joseph Samosky’s bioengineering course is nearing a pilot program in clinics.
Scott O'Neal in a red sweater in front of a choir
As part of the Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh, public health project manager Scott O’Neal recently debuted the role of Satan in a metal opera based on “Paradise Lost.” The production was the brainchild of Stewart Copeland of The Police.