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Divider screen with a blue and brown world-art motif in the Global Hub
Part student lounge and part academic resource center, the cozy and colorful Global Hub features the touch-screen Engagement Wall, which introduces all of Pitt’s global learning options. Students can find out how to learn a new language, earn an international studies certificate, explore internship possibilities, register to study abroad, take a class, join a club — or just meet new people and exchange ideas.
Two students push a housing cart on move-in day
The latest additions to the Pitt community — its new undergraduate, graduate and professional students — are just about to infuse campus with their ideas, enthusiasm and determination to meet their highest goals.
Two goats on leashes stand at the top of a hill overlooking Pitt campus with the Cathedral of Learning in the background
A treacherous landscaping job on Pitt's upper campus proved to be no obstacle for a herd of goats. The team of caprine workers conquered a nearly vertical hillside, stripping it of weeds, brush and vines — all in the service of safely and sustainably beautifying campus before students returned for fall term.
Pitt alumnus Jeremy M. Raymer in a PIttsburgh Pirates shirt standing in front of a mural he painted of Pirates baseball player Roberto Clemente
A mural of the late baseball legend Roberto Clemente greets drivers on Interstate 279 thanks to Jeremy M. Raymer, a Pitt engineering alumnus whose studio art courses at the University led to a new career as an artist. Clemente died in a 1972 plane crash while assisting with the delivery of emergency supplies following an earthquake in NIcaragua. He would have been 85 this Sunday, Aug. 18.
tether device in foreground with swimmer in pool in the background wearing script Pitt swim cap
A University of Pittsburgh research team has developed a new device for swimmers, called Impulse, which measures force production to aid coaches and athletes in determining better ways to improve performance and prevent injury. And they’re starting with students on Pitt’s Swimming and Diving team.
Carl Setzer and Liu Fang
Carl Setzer (GSPIA ’07) opened Beijing's first craft brewery with his wife Liu Fang. Now, their business is at the forefront of China's growing craft-brewing scene.
Illustration of girl with long hair blowing back behind her
When one person becomes part of the other: New lungs and bone marrow help some patients with no other options.
Ray and Burgett, the latter holding a baby
Working parents in academia face some tough challenges. Health science researchers Jackie Burgette and Kristin Ray are doing their part to remedy a big one: child care at conferences.
a head shot of the researcher
As a scientist at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Mining Program, Lauren Chubb (A&S ’10, GSPH ’13, ’16) has developed on-the-spot air analysis software to help keep miners safe.
a butterfly with a black body and glassy wings at an orange flower
With nature as their muse, Swanson School of Engineering researchers have developed a durable, clear, anti-fogging and liquid-resistant glass using machine learning to expedite design testing.
Massart standing in a green space between a couple of brick buildings. She's wearing a black dress with three-quarter-length arms and a blue shawl, and has her arms crossed over her chest.
With the advent of direct-to-consumer genetic testing, patients are showing up at doctors’ offices with big questions about their genes. Physicians, however, aren’t usually trained to answer them. Enter Mylynda Massart and others at Pitt.
a black and white photo of Hapke in a suit, holding a vial of moon dust
As a postdoctoral researcher, Bruce Hapke helped NASA determine the consistency of the moon’s soil, which helped engineers create the proper boots, rovers and wheeled equipment for the Apollo 11 landing, which happened 50 years ago this Saturday. Hapke and others at Pitt have helped build on a legacy of space research.
Dodd smiling in a white Giant Eagle branded apron
Through partnerships with grocery stores and government entities, Judy Dodd, an assistant professor of nutrition and dietetics, has been educating students and consumers on healthier eating habits for decades. The Retail Dietitians Business Alliance recently honored her work.
Students from Pittsburgh’s Hill District put their coding skills to the test to recreate the 1978 game Space Invaders, using a computer program provided by Pitt’s Swanson School of Engineering and the School of Computing and Information. The coding exercise was part of a three-day STEM mini-camp hosted by Pitt’s Hill District Community Engagement Center.
Clark, wearing a dark pullover and pants, standing in an aquarium tunnel with sea life swimming behind him
Through his research as an evolutionary geneticist, Pitt’s Nathan Clark is exploring how and why genes and genomes have evolved over time.