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A black and white image overlaid with green, yellow and red tint, of a protest. A person is holding a sign that says "Racism is the biggest pandemic"
Artists have until Feb. 1 to submit their work to the “Don’t Look Away: Because Mattering is the Minimum” exhibit, which asks the question, “What does Black Lives Matter mean to you?” The exhibit will travel to all Pitt campuses and feature performances.
Lissette Escariz Ferrá in a red, orange and pink dress standing outdoors
Why does the “Letter from Birmingham Jail” still speak to us today? Third-year PhD student and composition instructor Lissette Escariz Ferrá helps her students understand.
A person in a blue shirt stands in the middle of murals painted on walls
Following a year in which calls for racial equity and social justice rose to new prominence, the University’s annual Social Justice Week, running Jan 18-22, presents a renewed opportunity for the Pitt community to contemplate the life and legacy of civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr.
a black and white image of Dr. King
A new online resource from the University Library System serves as an entry point into learning about Martin Luther King Jr. and his legacy. “Activism starts with awareness, and that’s what this guide is all about,” said Tyrica Terry Kapral, humanities data librarian.
Joanne Rogers in front of a sign with Mister Rogers on it
Students, faculty and staff join people around Pittsburgh and across the country today in remembering beloved Pittsburgher Joanne Rogers, longtime spouse of the late Mister Rogers. She died Jan. 14 at 92.
A person in a black face mask and T-shirt receiving a vaccination
Almost by accident, Pittsburgh police officer Antonio Ruiz joined the Moderna vaccine trial at Pitt. Read how his experience played out.
An empty wheelchair
Telehealth visits to help veterans access and adjust technology such as wheelchairs were just as effective as in-person visits, two studies from Pitt’s Human Engineering Research Laboratories found. The authors say continuing remote visits after the pandemic could even improve care.
José-Alain Sahel in a black suit and white shirt holding a white square
The University of Pittsburgh today announced a collaboration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health to help address the needs of the visually impaired through the expertise, facilities and research of the world-class School of Medicine’s Department of Ophthalmology.
Ervin Dyer outdoors in a light blue dress shirt and tie
A pilot program that connects students in an Introduction to Africana Studies course to residents in the Hill District is helping create a bridge from the University to the community.
A student with blue-green and black hair uses lab equipment
Simply acknowledging that college is challenging during introductory science courses has helped to close racial and gender achievement gaps. The intervention, begun in a Pitt biology course, is being adopted at universities around the country.
A person standing in front of a blackboard in a black top, with a screenshot of an animal superimposed
From cannibal worms to fish with clear blood, second-year PhD student April Rich explains unusual topics in biology for intermediate learners.
A person sitting in the corner of a dark red room with a camera facing them
The Center for Creativity’s One Minute Film Festival gave members of the Pitt community a chance to explore writing, storytelling and filmmaking in a compact form. See the winners.
Ryan Caginalp, in a black jacket, uses a high powered telescope at night
Ryan Caginalp, a 16-year-old student in the University Honors College and Swanson School of Engineering, ramped up his astrophotography hobby during the pandemic. See some of his celestial images.
A person in a blue shirt and jeans buckling in a seat belt
For The Conversation, Randy P. Juhl, Pitt Dean Emeritus and Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Pharmacy, wrote about what it takes to change behavior due to health risks—and what it means for the COVID-19 pandemic.
Dick Thornburgh in a gray suit and red tie shaking a man's hand behind a lectern
The former Pennsylvania governor and U.S. attorney general was a champion of justice who left a lasting legacy both within and beyond the University.