School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Three seedlings in the soil
The 2020 Pitt Seed Grant winners span departments, Community Engagement Centers and regional campuses in subjects as varied as dependent care, STEM research and National Science Foundation grant preparation. The program, now in its third year, supports projects that align with the six goals in The Plan for Pitt.
Carey Balaban in a dark suit and yellow tie
Carey Balaban from the School of Medicine led a study into a curious 2016 case concerning U.S. diplomats in Havana, Cuba, and their families, who had mysterious symptoms including dizziness, ear pain and tinnitus. The researchers found marked differences between the patterns of response of those embassy staffers and victims of other mild, traumatic brain injuries.
Two boys in black t-shirts playing in a field
Pittsburgh’s Homewood neighborhood has a new group of certified babysitters. They’re graduates of a program that’s not only shaping future childcare providers, but entrepreneurs, too.
A person types on a purple Braille keyboard
With the move to online instruction, making electronic accessibility a priority is not just about accommodating people with disabilities; it’s about considering the broad range of students and their learning styles.
A physician in a white coat applies a device to a young woman's throat
COVID-19 can affect more than the lungs: some patients also leave the hospital with muscle weakness, heart problems and trouble swallowing. Three researchers from Pitt’s School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences discuss how their field can help in recovery.
Rory Cooper (left) with friend David Gifford (right) just before the 2020 virtual Pittsburgh Marathon
Last October, Rory Cooper crashed his handcycle during the early miles of a marathon. The director of Pitt’s Human Engineering Research Laboratories would go on to finish the remaining 23.2 miles, then spend four days in a coma. Read about his incredible recovery, and his long history of working to improve wheelchair users’ lives.