School of Medicine

A depiction of the coronavirus

Former Pitt Fellow Puts Leadership Skills to Use in Fight Against Coronavirus

Zhiyong Peng, a former fellow at the University of Pittsburgh, heads the department of critical care medicine at Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, which has seen 28,000 cases of coronavirus. He recalls his time at Pitt as formative for his leadership and management skills.
Steve Thorne sitting at a table in a dark jacket

Immunotherapy Companies Make Strides in Fight Against Cancer

As the global community recognizes World Cancer Day on Feb. 4, Pitt research and spinouts make headway in the future of cancer care.
Suketu Mansuria and Noah Rindos in white coats

New Center Sheds Light on Chronic Pelvic Pain

The Chronic Pelvic Pain and Endometriosis Center is approaching common, painful problems with a unified team of gynecologists, psychiatrists, physical therapists and surgeons. It aims to improve early diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis and to further research for the condition.
Rachel Coombs

Lounge Opens for Graduate and Professional Students

The new space, meant to forge connections and encourage cross-campus collaboration, is the result of efforts led by the Graduate and Professional Student Government.
Coronavirus

Snakes Could Be the Original Source of the New Coronavirus Outbreak in China

Pitt virologists answer questions concerning coronavirus and how the recent outbreak started.
Bridget Hunt-Tobey

Alumna Sheds Light on Understudied Part of African American History

When Bridget Hunt-Tobey (MED ’19) took a course on human anatomy as part of Pitt’s Biomedical Master’s Program, she had no idea it would lead her to study bones of African American blast furnace workers in a first-ever internship program with the Smithsonian Institute.
JoAnne Flynn

Researchers Find More Effective Way to Administer Tuberculosis Vaccine

As part of the global push to prevent tuberculosis, Distinguished Professor JoAnne Flynn and a group of Pitt and National Institutes of Health researchers have discovered that intravenously injecting the standard tuberculosis vaccine could boost its power.