School of Medicine

a blue-scrubbed person putting an intubation device into a clear box with a mannequin inside
Intubating COVID-19 patients can be dangerous for the health care provider. A new biocontainment unit developed by a Pitt-UPMC team trapped more than 99.99% of simulated virus-sized aerosols and prevented them from escaping into the environment
A person in a black top and necklace
A study led by pathology’s Samira Kiani and published today in Nature Cell Biology showed that a new approach to CRISPR briefly suppressed genes to control the immune response in mice, making gene therapy delivery more effective.
A person in a face mask, gloves and lab coat pipes material into a tray underneath a glass shield
Underrepresented undergraduate students interested in microbiology or immunology can apply for a new scholarship program to support their studies.
Angus in a blue suit
Published as part of a four-article package today in JAMA, research led by Pitt’s Derek Angus found that an inexpensive treatment of steroids can substantially improve survival in critically ill COVID-19 patients. The findings, part of a multi-site global trial, were so stark that the World Health Organization is updating its treatment guidance for the disease.
A network of groups of people connected by lines
Contact tracing has been underway at Pitt for months to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. To make it effective, the entire Pitt community is being asked to follow certain procedures when any of its members test positive or experience symptoms.
A man in a white lab coat standing in a lab
MicroRNAs, tiny molecules that circulate in the bloodstream, could be the key to how diseases from pulmonary hypertension to cancer spread throughout the body, a new study led by Stephen Chan has found.
A man in blue scrubs standing by a helicopter
Diagnosing a heart attack can be difficult, especially for prehospital emergency personnel. Using computer modeling, a team led by nursing’s Salah Al-Zaiti identified 37% more heart attacks in a study published in Nature Communications.
a man in a longsleeve shirt and jeans sitting outside with his hands on his face and his eyes closed
New research published in Preventive Medicine shows men who subscribe to strong gender norms are more likely to harm themselves and others.