School of Social Work

a woman smiling big
While it might not feel like it, more than a few good things happened in 2020. Here are stories of Pitt people and programs that made the world better during a turbulent year.
two people sitting in chairs with a geometric building outside the window behind them
Pitt photographers share a collection of photos from a year like no other.
Sun breaking through trees in front of the Cathedral of Learning
Optimism is hardwired in most humans, says public health professor Steve Albert. If you don’t feel like you’re one of them right now, here are three perspectives on why, despite all that 2020 brought us, things are looking brighter.
A crowd of people standing together
In 2019, Pitt social work faculty surveyed the mental health well-being of staff at social service agencies and schools as the community approached the first anniversary of the Tree of Life tragedy. The data led to enhanced training and treatment for staff at these agencies, two years later.
A panther statue
A cohort of 150 students from the Class of 2021 will each receive up to $5,000 in student loan relief upon graduation. The students were introduced at a virtual kickoff celebration last week.
A person in sunglasses and a face mask holds her hands up to a window
As the Pittsburgh campus shifts to Guarded Risk operational posture this week, more courses and activities are moving toward in-person experiences. Take a look at some of the classrooms, lecture halls and tents where folks are working under the Flex@Pitt model.
Two people in face masks, across a desk from one another
When unprecedented hardship struck Pittsburgh's Latino population, Pitt alumna Monica Ruiz (SOC WK ’15, ’17G) took action.
A person in a green sweater
Social work graduate student Ashlé Hall (SOC WK ’18) is a busy entrepreneur with a new line of hair care products designed to fill two very important needs.
a lit LED candle
This year marks a celebration of the 100th annual Lantern Night, and like many events, it looks a little different this year. But this isn’t the first time the tradition has evolved.