coronavirus

A person in a blue face mask and white lab coat holds up a gold object
A recent survey of University research-related staff and postdocs shows that nearly two-thirds of respondents felt that Pitt’s research restart had gone at least as well as or better than they expected.
A depiction of a bloodstream and a virus
The National Institutes of Health has selected Pitt to lead a trio of Phase 3 clinical trials involving COVID-19 patients that will explore the use of blood thinners in saving lives and improving care.
A man in a Pitt face mask and striped shirt
Compressing the academic calendar to finish on-campus learning by Thanksgiving break means Labor Day is a class and work day at Pitt this year. The move was designed to limit the risk of spreading COVID-19 during the holiday travel season.
A person in a face mask next to a tablet
Face coverings are now required—indoors and out—regardless of Pitt’s operational posture.
a blue-scrubbed person putting an intubation device into a clear box with a mannequin inside
Intubating COVID-19 patients can be dangerous for the health care provider. A new biocontainment unit developed by a Pitt-UPMC team trapped more than 99.99% of simulated virus-sized aerosols and prevented them from escaping into the environment
A person in a blue shirt and face mask bicycles on the street
On foot or on wheels, there are more ways than ever to get around on the Pittsburgh campus. Learn all about the current options and what’s just around the corner.
A woman in an orange shirt leaning against a brick wall
While Pennsylvania was in the midst of COVID-19 shelter-in-place orders, Pitt senior Gina Watkins was digging into the reasoning behind past quarantine measures—finding racism and xenophobia were major players in policy decisions.
A Zoom meeting with three visible participants
This back-to-school season, the PittEd Justice Collective convened a panel of experts for a webinar on how to create remote learning environments that are anti-racist and equitable.
two women in masks
“If you can avoid it, you should avoid it, and there’s no reason to not take reasonable precautions,” says Madeleine Biache, a Pitt student who contracted COVID-19 this spring. See what advice she has for students as they return to campus this fall.
A network of groups of people connected by lines
Contact tracing has been underway at Pitt for months to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. To make it effective, the entire Pitt community is being asked to follow certain procedures when any of its members test positive or experience symptoms.