Department of Bioengineering

Prince Matthews in a pink shirt and black suit, and Stephanie Wiltman
Meet Prince Matthew and Stephanie Wiltman—the graduate students speaking at Sunday’s celebration of the Class of 2020.
Emily Oby in a white tank top holding equipment
Researchers at Pitt and Carnegie Mellon University are finding out how the brain learns new tasks, which could help people who have suffered injuries to the nervous system. Their latest findings were published today in Nature Biomedical Engineering.
The American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) has announced the induction of Douglas J. Weber, associate...
Tyler Bray (left) and Jacob Meadows (right) bioengineering seniors in Pitt’s Swanson School of Engineering, in blue Pitt jackets, sitting at a table with their Posture Protect vest on top.
Posture Protect doesn’t just help users sit up straight—it could help people with Parkinson’s disease avoid falls. The student innovation effort that started in Joseph Samosky’s bioengineering course is nearing a pilot program in clinics.
Amanda Carbone
Two Pitt projects will blast off to the International Space Station this spring to study microgravity’s effects on people and spacecrafts. The research brings together faculty, students and a tiny, see-through crustacean.
Garrett Coyan at the 2019 Pitt Innovation Challenge
To address the critical need for long-lasting heart valve replacements, a team of Pitt researchers created a mesh that harnesses the body’s own healing power.
The question for regenerative medicine research is “‘What can we do in space that we can't do on Earth that makes a difference?’" said William Wagner, director of the McGowan Institute, which has joined with the International Space Station U.S. National Laboratory to look for answers. "That's a pretty exciting question, because it's currently unanswered."
Gelsy Torres-Oviedo in white jacket over blue shirt, standing on a rooftop overlooking Pitt campus with Cathedral of Learning prominently in the background
For stroke survivors whose ability to walk has been impaired by neurological damage, rehabilitation using robotics has proven to be an effective therapy to improve their gait. However, one of the major issues with this type of rehabilitation is that following training with a robotic device, motor improvements are not maintained in the patient’s daily life. Gelsy Torres-Oviedo, of Pitt's Swanson School of Engineering, is applying a novel approach to improve locomotor learning in stroke patients.