Department of English

Jeanne Marie Laskas

“The Mister Rogers No One Saw”: Jeanne Marie Laskas Pens Essay in The New York Times Magazine

Jeanne Marie Laskas, Distinguished Professor of English in the Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences and founding...
Shannon Wanless and Aisha White

Mister Rogers’ Legacy Beyond the TV Screen

It may not come as a surprise that Pitt neighbor Mister Rogers left an imprint on the School of Education and related programs, but the Department of English, too? His approach to childhood development is alive on campus and beyond even today.
A mural of August Wilson in the Hill District neighborhood of Pittsburgh

An Open Access Gem: Pitt Publishes First-ever August Wilson Journal

Pitt's University Library System is the publisher of a new journal dedicated to Pittsburgh native son and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright August Wilson. The inaugural issue features contributions from the Department of History's Laurence Glasco and English faculty member emeritus Christopher Rawson.
Book cover for "The Skin I'm In," by Sharon Flake.

After More Than Two Decades, Alumna's Acclaimed ‘The Skin I’m In’ Still Resonates

The award-winning young adult novel “The Skin I'm In,” by Department of English alumna Sharon Flake (A&S ’78), has sold more than 1 million copies worldwide. The author's debut novel, it tells the story of a 13-year-old girl who learns to overcome being bullied for her dark skin.
a woman and man at an anchor desk

Inaugural Broadcast Course in Pitt Studios Gives Hands-on Experience to Students

Alumnus Kevin Smith brought his expertise back to Pitt after a 17-year Hollywood career writing movie and TV screenplays to instruct the innovative new course.
latex zombie head

University of Pittsburgh Library System Acquires George A. Romero Collection

Props, screenplays, script notes and more — Pitt now has more than 50 years’ worth of items from George A. Romero, the filmmaker who revolutionized the horror genre, beginning with “Night of the Living Dead.” The new collection marks a growth in horror studies resources available to scholars and the public.