Department of Immunology

Greg Delgoffe in a striped white shirt
A study led by immunology’s Greg Delgoffe and published in Nature shows how chemicals in the areas surrounding tumors subvert the immune system and enable cancer to evade attack. These findings suggest that an existing drug could boost cancer immunotherapy.
A person in a face mask, gloves and lab coat pipes material into a tray underneath a glass shield
Underrepresented undergraduate students interested in microbiology or immunology can apply for a new scholarship program to support their studies.
A depiction of cells
The immune system often stops itself from destroying cancer cells. In order to win against cancer, we need a deeper understanding about how our bodies work.
Steve Thorne sitting at a table in a dark jacket
As the global community recognizes World Cancer Day on Feb. 4, Pitt research and spinouts make headway in the future of cancer care.
artistic-scientific panels used as decor at 5000 Baum announcement event
The University of Pittsburgh is creating a research, entrepreneurship and innovation hub to nurture and speed the development of new ideas and breakthrough technologies. The results could reinvent the way health care is delivered.
Amanda Poholek
Amanda Poholek, assistant professor in the departments of pediatrics and immunology at Pitt School of Medicine, was awarded a $40...
Vignali smiling
The discovery shows that the immune system can be tweaked in order to find and destroy cancer cells more effectively.
Robert L. Ferris, a 15-year veteran of the UPMC Hillman Cancer Center, head and neck cancer specialist and a leading voice in immunotherapy, begins July 1.