health care

mom holding baby, flanked by the two Pitt doctors who lead the operation
Baby Emery Green Mullen, named after the lead surgeons who corrected a neural tube defect before her birth, is doing well as the first patient in Pitt history to receive in utero surgery for spina bifida.
woman holding a bottle of essential oils near her nose
In a study that expands on previous work, a team led by psychology’s Michael Sayette found reduced urges to smoke in response to pleasant smells, as well as a connection to memory.
Gellad in a light blue shirt and dark blue tie
Walid Gellad, associate professor of medicine and health policy and director of Pitt’s Center for Pharmaceutical Policy and Prescribing, is using machine-learning algorithms to predict who is at risk of opioid misuse and overdose.
Hatfull in a green coat, wearing gloves and looking at a round slide of phages
Research efforts in Graham Hatfull’s lab involving phages, or viruses that infect bacteria, saved a cystic fibrosis patient from a life-threatening infection. This therapeutic first couldn’t have happened without the help of undergraduate students.
woman in a dark blazer in an office with a bright yellow and red decoration behind her
Mari Webel will continue her work that melds history and public health as Pitt’s first-ever Andrew W. Mellon Foundation New Directions Fellow.
Mallepalli in a spruce turtle neck in front of a big window looking out on Oakland
Abhignya Mallepalli thought she’d become a doctor someday, but a series of inspiring instructors and impactful experiences in local hospitals changed her path.