The Plan for Pitt: Engage in Research of Impact

Award-Winning Study of Veterans Finds Increased Risk for Unsafe Prescribing

Veterans prescribed medications through both the Veterans Affairs and Medicare had more than double the odds of exposure to potentially unsafe medication, a study from Pitt pharmacists has found — and improved communication between the systems could help solve the problem.
headshot of Maliha Zahid, wearing white lab coat

Cardiologist's Creation Aims to Reduce Radiation Exposure From Stress Tests

Cardiologist Maliha Zahid aims to reduce the amount of radiation that patients are exposed to when undergoing diagnostic imaging. Her creation, to be used during cardiac stress tests, was a Pitt Innovation Challenge winner.
Amy Ni headshot

Researchers Shed New Light on the Neuroscience of Paying Attention

New University of Pittsburgh research advances the understanding of how two seemingly different brain processes related to attention are more similar than previously thought, which could someday lead to improved targets for drug researchers.
Porter in a brightly colored red blouse and scarf

Educators Team Up to Develop Flexible Curricula on Ethiopia for K-12 Students

Visits with artists, dancers and musicians and interviews with entrepreneurs and religious leaders helped teams of Pitt and Ethiopian educators create a set of lessons that teachers worldwide can use to introduce their students to the East African nation.

Engineer Visits Recent Natural Disaster Sites for Insight on Infrastructure Improvements

Hurricane Maria wreaked havoc on Puerto Rico, damaging much of its energy infrastructure. Pitt’s Alexis Kwasinski visited the island and other sites of natural disasters to find ways to update energy sources to withstand such storms.

Researchers Revise How Americans Get Healthy

Pitt's John M. Jakicic and Kirk I. Erickson are updating the nation’s physical activity guidelines. Among their suggestions: Even a burst of activity for less than 10 minutes can help deskbound workers stay healthier.

Research on Blood Clots Could Lead to Better Bleeding Control on the Battlefield and Beyond

Platelets — the body’s internal Band-Aids — are sometimes too effective at stopping bleeding, causing potentially dangerous clots. Matthew D. Neal, assistant professor of surgery and critical care medicine, and others are searching for ways to regulate clotting to help trauma victims.