Latest News

Tejasvi Gowda
A group of Pitt medical students have started sprawling volunteer efforts to help children and adults in need, both virtually and door to doorstep.
Douglas White
Douglas White, professor in the Department of Critical Care Medicine and director of its Program on Ethics and Decision Making in Critical Illness, published a new framework that helps hospitals ethically allocate scarce critical care resources such as ventilators during the pandemic.
Paul Duprex in a suit and green tie
The Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations is committing nearly $5 million to a consortium that includes the University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Vaccine Research to develop a vaccine for the novel coronavirus.
A depiction of the coronavirus superimposed on graphs and charts and numbers.
Sharing data and model results is crucial in the new research culture emerging during the COVID-19 outbreak, and Pitt is making that possible on a global scale.
A person in an apron prepares a meal in the kitchen
Pitt instructor and nutritionist Caroline Passerrello shares reminders for making healthy meals from pantry staples for the whole family, including pets.
Image of cover-19 virus, portrayed in red on a blue background. Words COVID-19 Update overlaid
On March 3, Pitt announced that it was canceling all University-sponsored spring break travel involving air travel, and instructing students studying in programs in Spain, France and Germany to return to the United States and engage in social distancing. 
A depiction of nerves surrounding the eye.
Ian Sigal, founding director of the Laboratory of Ocular Biomechanics in the University of Pittsburgh Department of Ophthalmology, surveys the ever-changing landscape of the eye.
A person sits with hands on their lap, next to another person writing on a clipboard.
Pitt researcher Daniel Hall said as population ages, assessing risk is even more essential to ensure that surgery is offered to the right patients, consistent with their goals and values.
A depiction of DNA
Evolutionary biologists teamed up with rhetoric scholars to find a common understanding of what it means for a gene to be functional.
Liza Konnikova in a white coat and black shirt
Liza Konnikova from pediatrics and her colleagues discovered that the fetal gut possesses almost complete immune capacity as early as 14 weeks, challenging the ideas that most biology textbooks teach.
A depiction of cells
The immune system often stops itself from destroying cancer cells. In order to win against cancer, we need a deeper understanding about how our bodies work.
A depiction of a coronavirus
While identifying a new disease by its place of origin seems intuitive, history demonstrates that doing so can harm the people who live there, contends Pitt historian Mari Webel.
Tyler Bray (left) and Jacob Meadows (right) bioengineering seniors in Pitt’s Swanson School of Engineering, in blue Pitt jackets, sitting at a table with their Posture Protect vest on top.
Posture Protect doesn’t just help users sit up straight—it could help people with Parkinson’s disease avoid falls. The student innovation effort that started in Joseph Samosky’s bioengineering course is nearing a pilot program in clinics.
Duprex in a suit and green tie in front of a University of Pittsburgh background
The University of Pittsburgh is among a select few institutions expected to receive samples of the coronavirus for study. In his remarks to the University Senate, Paul Duprex, director of the Center for Vaccine Research, highlighted the tremendous history the University has in working on vaccines and why this matters.
Naeem Aziz, wearing a black coat and shirt, speaking to panelist Zhaojin Zeng, wearing a light blue dress shirt in front of a crowd
More than 250 people attended a panel discussion on Feb. 12 to hear a group of Pitt and county experts discuss the coronavirus outbreak.