Faculty & Teaching

Close up of a person's hand holding a smart phone displaying Facebook, with a laptop computer in the background.
Facebook has morphed from a college student social network into a global tech powerhouse. Pitt faculty members discuss its influence, from grassroots organizing to "fake news."
a coin with the bitcoin symbol printed on it, in front of a stock-market-looking graph
Bitcoin — the world’s first digital currency to operate independent of any centralized institution — had a wild 2018 and enters an equally tumultuous 2019, experts predict. How will it fare? Pitt researchers weigh in.
Balazs in front of a tan background, wearing a purple sweater
Inspired by the inner workings of a mechanical pencil in grade school, Anna Balazs went on to launch a career that blurs the boundaries between the living and nonliving in engineering and biology.
woman kneeling over a person in a neck brace
Taught by the School of Medicine’s Paul Paris, the undergraduate course aims to help students become more aware of the factors that impact their thinking in emergency medical situations.
Laskas in a red shirt at a microphone
With support from Pitt’s Department of English and the Center for Creativity, Jeanne Marie Laskas sifted through hundreds of citizens’ letters to President Obama, resulting in an acclaimed magazine story and full-length book.
Kris and Dave Karthak, seated next to each other, smiling
With the 2018 midterm elections swiftly approaching, University of Pittsburgh faculty member Kris Kanthak is trying to make discussing politics a little easier to navigate — with the help of someone familiar.
Black and white film still from "Night of the Living Dead" showing several zombies crossing a field
Film and media studies professor Adam Lowenstein brings his expertise to Pittsburgh’s 50th anniversary celebration of the classic horror flick “Night of the Living Dead.”
Cameron in a blue-gray shirt and thin wire glasses
Writing program alumnus Cameron Barnett’s first book of poetry, “The Drowning Boy’s Guide to Water,” gained national attention and awards. Today, he’s a teacher at Fanny Edel Falk Laboratory School — the same place where he first dreamed of becoming a writer.
father and son standing in front of a green chalkboard
The most exciting professional collaboration in Gunduz Caginalp’s 34-year career at Pitt came in 2018, when he published a paper co-authored with his 24-year old son and Department of Mathematics visiting scholar, Carey Caginalp (A&S ’11).
Patricia Beeson headshot, wearing black/white jacket
An app matching students to tutors and a Netflix-like recommendation system to find mentors are among the projects funded by the Office of the Provost’s first Personalized Education Grants Program.