Innovation & Research

A person in a black top and necklace
A study led by pathology’s Samira Kiani and published today in Nature Cell Biology showed that a new approach to CRISPR briefly suppressed genes to control the immune response in mice, making gene therapy delivery more effective.
Angus in a blue suit
Published as part of a four-article package today in JAMA, research led by Pitt’s Derek Angus found that an inexpensive treatment of steroids can substantially improve survival in critically ill COVID-19 patients. The findings, part of a multi-site global trial, were so stark that the World Health Organization is updating its treatment guidance for the disease.
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While Pennsylvania was in the midst of COVID-19 shelter-in-place orders, Pitt senior Gina Watkins was digging into the reasoning behind past quarantine measures—finding racism and xenophobia were major players in policy decisions.
triangle chips that look like Doritos spread out on a blue background
Should dieters worry about portion sizes or “light” versions of a snack? Assistant Professor Peggy Liu led a series of studies to find out.
an image of the coronavirus
Virologist Megan Culler Freeman has been curious about reinfections since the pandemic began. For The Conversation, she addressed some questions raised by a man who reportedly was reinfected with SARS-CoV-2.
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From swimming devices to rare disease gene therapies, Pitt inventors never stop: The Innovation Institute reported a record 394 invention disclosures for last fiscal year, and Director Evan Facher says another robust year is ahead.
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Ever wondered how to move a mechanical arm using only your mind? Third-year student Audrey Case can explain.
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MicroRNAs, tiny molecules that circulate in the bloodstream, could be the key to how diseases from pulmonary hypertension to cancer spread throughout the body, a new study led by Stephen Chan has found.
A man in blue scrubs standing by a helicopter
Diagnosing a heart attack can be difficult, especially for prehospital emergency personnel. Using computer modeling, a team led by nursing’s Salah Al-Zaiti identified 37% more heart attacks in a study published in Nature Communications.
A earbud in a woman's left ear
Native English speakers often have trouble with tonal languages like Chinese. A new study showed that vagus nerve stimulation allowed research participants to pick up some Mandarin tones more quickly.