Innovation & Research

David Lebel in a black suit and dark blue tie
As states begin to relax stay-at-home orders and businesses prepare to reopen after pandemic-related closures, managers will play a crucial role in helping their teams work effectively. Organizational behavior researcher David Lebel shares his tips for managing teams in the face of fear.
Amy Baby in a green shirt working on a laptop on a table
Thanks to system administrators, IT workers and computer scientists, Assistant Professor Amy Babay says networks and internet services have been able to withstand the extra strain during COVID-19.
Lisa Rohan in a white coat
Pitt Pharmacy’s Lisa Rohan is developing a nasal spray using a compound derived from algae and a plant in the tobacco family that could help keep the novel coronavirus from infecting the lungs.
A woman eats popcorn while looking at her laptop
Many people are grappling with eating habits as we spend more time at home. There’s a difference between eating mindlessly and eating distractedly, says Pitt researcher Carli Liguori, and she has tips for combating both.
Audrey Murrell and Ray Jones
Our food ecosystem is broken, says business professor and acting dean of the Honors College Audrey J. Murrell. Research at Pitt and partnerships in the community aim to help fix it.
A person scrolls on a smartphone
The teams in this year’s Randall Family Big Idea Competition couldn’t be stopped—competitors asked the organizers to go digital, and they obliged. See the winners.
A depiction of the coronavirus
The Clinical and Translational Science Institute at the University of Pittsburgh has awarded $900,000 to 17 studies to address different aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic.
a man in a hospital bed and a monitor next to it with CO2 and blood flow numbers on it
The Hemolung respiratory assist system, which was designed at the University of Pittsburgh, has been granted emergency use authorization from the FDA to treat lung failure caused by COVID-19.
A teenager takes a selfie while lying on a bed next to a computer
Pitt psychologist Sophia Choukas-Bradley has developed a scale for gauging body image consciousness, and using it, she’s found that teens think about the way they present to an online audience, even in their offline moments.
Emily Oby in a white tank top holding equipment
Researchers at Pitt and Carnegie Mellon University are finding out how the brain learns new tasks, which could help people who have suffered injuries to the nervous system. Their latest findings were published today in Nature Biomedical Engineering.