Department of Critical Care Medicine

Nicholas Goodmanson and Rachel Mennies
Rachel Mennies, spouse of critical care doctor and Pitt alumnus Nicholas Goodmanson (MED ’13, ’16, ’18), writes about the worries and moments of connection she and other partners of physicians are experiencing during the pandemic.
A person wearing a T-shirt that displays where they matched for residency
When a capstone celebration turned virtual this year, medical students pulled together to donate the money they had raised for the event to communities in need—and challenged faculty to do the same.
A novel clinical trial developed by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine launched this week at UPMC to address one of the most important debates during the COVID-19 pandemic: How should doctors decide between quickly adopting new therapies and waiting until they are tested in longer clinical trials?
Alyson Stover in a black shirt
Virtual visits with health care providers are becoming more important than ever during the pandemic. Pitt’s Alyson Stover is working to bring telehealth to occupational therapy and other practitioners beyond the primary care clinic.
Douglas White
Douglas White, professor in the Department of Critical Care Medicine and director of its Program on Ethics and Decision Making in Critical Illness, published a new framework that helps hospitals ethically allocate scarce critical care resources such as ventilators during the pandemic.
A depiction of the coronavirus
Zhiyong Peng, a former fellow at the University of Pittsburgh, heads the department of critical care medicine at Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, which has seen 28,000 cases of coronavirus. He recalls his time at Pitt as formative for his leadership and management skills.
a sketch of the backpack in stretcher mode, with a person/dummy lying on it
A multidisciplinary team led by Ron Poropatich is working on a specialized medical backpack for the U.S. Army that could help injured patients in the field survive until they reach a fully staffed hospital.
Platelets — the body’s internal Band-Aids — are sometimes too effective at stopping bleeding, causing potentially dangerous clots. Matthew D. Neal, assistant professor of surgery and critical care medicine, and others are searching for ways to regulate clotting to help trauma victims.
Night Shift video game character headshot on blue background
As reigning champions of STAT Madness — a bracket-style, national innovation contest — Pitt and UPMC hope this year’s entry, the emergency doctor video game Night Shift, can hold the crown.