Faculty & Teaching

A football, a face mask and a bottle of hand sanitizer on a football field
The first pregame poem, first matchup with home-field advantage, first female officiant: Pitt experts offer commentary on Sunday’s historic game. Plus, a branding pro on what to expect from this year’s commercials.
Esa Davis in a red and blue shirt in front of a plant
Esa Davis, associate professor of medicine and clinical and translational science, has been appointed to the national panel of experts tasked with making evidence-based recommendations about clinical preventive services and priorities for future study.
A snow man in a purple scarf
Much to the disappointment of schoolchildren everywhere, probably, says Cassie Quigley in Pitt’s School of Education. But there’s a silver lining.
Barry Mitnick in a black suit and red tie
For decades, presidents routinely replaced large swaths of the government workforce, often requiring them to pay fees to political parties in exchange for their jobs. Professor Barry Mitnick explains the history of the “spoils” system in The Conversation.
An American flag in the lawn in front of the Cathedral of Learning
As the Biden-Harris presidential transition begins, Pitt experts share their thoughts on racial justice, immigration and other significant issues that face the incoming administration.
Lissette Escariz Ferrá in a red, orange and pink dress standing outdoors
Why does the “Letter from Birmingham Jail” still speak to us today? Third-year PhD student and composition instructor Lissette Escariz Ferrá helps her students understand.
A student with blue-green and black hair uses lab equipment
Simply acknowledging that college is challenging during introductory science courses has helped to close racial and gender achievement gaps. The intervention, begun in a Pitt biology course, is being adopted at universities around the country.
A woman in a black suit jacket and pink head band
Lorie Johnson-Osho will manage and refine faculty development programs and workshops, help foster skill development and more. She begins her work on Dec. 7, 2020.
several folded newspapers over a gray background
From local to national news outlets, Pitt people have been sought-after sources in stories about the election. Read what they’ve have to say.
Voting buttons in a pile
In a year where the COVID-19 pandemic has altered usual in-person voting procedures and campaigns have raised early doubts about whether results will be accurate, Pitt experts say voters should be prepared for a range of outcomes.