Innovation & Research

Two women stand next to each other, one in brown and the other in pink
Sara Baumann (GSPH ’19) and Jessica Burke have created a new form of public health research called Collaborative Filmmaking. The six-step process engages its participants to create a detailed, multimedia form of study rarely seen in the field.
Pitt Public Health scientists found that a drop in the supply of carfentanil, a potent drug, was likely the reason behind 2018's decrease in overdose deaths, rather than U.S. efforts to curb them.
Sooraj Sharma (ENGR ’20) and a team of Pitt students created a type of self-cleaning glass that allows more solar energy to reach the power-generating portion of solar panels.
A woman in glasses with trees in the background
In a pair of studies, ecologist Jessica Stephenson found that both animals and humans instinctually hunker down in small groups when infection looms—but that impulse can come with a price.
A person in a face mask, white coat and blue gloves holds up a vial
The discovery in animals is being used to make a drug for potential therapeutic and preventive use against COVID-19 in humans.
A person in a blue face mask and white lab coat holds up a gold object
A recent survey of University research-related staff and postdocs shows that nearly two-thirds of respondents felt that Pitt’s research restart had gone at least as well as or better than they expected.
A depiction of a bloodstream and a virus
The National Institutes of Health has selected Pitt to lead a trio of Phase 3 clinical trials involving COVID-19 patients that will explore the use of blood thinners in saving lives and improving care.
A person in a green sweater
Social work graduate student Ashlé Hall (SOC WK ’18) is a busy entrepreneur with a new line of hair care products designed to fill two very important needs.
A depiction of cells in purple and blue
The Human BioMolecular Atlas Program is developing an open, global platform to map healthy cells so doctors, scientists and educators can better understand disease and the workings of the human body.
a blue-scrubbed person putting an intubation device into a clear box with a mannequin inside
Intubating COVID-19 patients can be dangerous for the health care provider. A new biocontainment unit developed by a Pitt-UPMC team trapped more than 99.99% of simulated virus-sized aerosols and prevented them from escaping into the environment