Innovation & Research

A person in a face mask and a white shirt holds a model in a gloved hand
Research published today in Science describes a new method to extract tiny but extremely powerful antibody fragments from llamas, which could then be fashioned into inhalable therapeutics for COVID-19. Tune in today at 3 p.m. EST for a press conference on the findings.
A woman in glasses and a black top holds a ear-shaped device to her head
It’s only fair that the Pitt Innovation Challenge would itself need to innovate. Find out which projects won this year’s competition—which awarded nearly $500,000—and how participants adjusted to a virtual event.
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If you missed yesterday’s panel discussion on rolling out a vaccine for COVID-19, watch the recording here, or read highlights from a wide-ranging discussion.
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Pitt’s Jonas Salk Chair for Vaccine Research explains why we need multiple candidate vaccines, what’s special about SARS-CoV-2 and why he’s hopeful about the future.
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When Jonas Salk and his Pitt team, supported by March of Dimes, tackled the polio pandemic, they came up with creative ways to make and distribute the vaccine. Dr. Rahul Gupta of March of Dimes explains why that sort of approach is needed to eradicate COVID-19 today.
A man in a gray-brown jacket and a light collared shirt and dark tie
At Pitt, the MiGEL Lab and its robot liquid handler play a major role in processing surveillance testing samples. Learn how samples are pooled, tested and sequenced to help in the battle against COVID-19.
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Peter Salk was 11 years old when a University of Pittsburgh team led by his father, the late Jonas Salk, created the inactivated poliovirus vaccine. Today, at 76, he’s back in the spotlight as researchers around the world race to develop new vaccines to stem the COVID-19 pandemic.
A person walks alone on a sidewalk in foggy weather beneath street lamps
As Americans continue to social distance, conditions such as seasonal affective disorder could make winter especially hard, says psychology’s Kathryn Roecklein. Read about her work and her tips for taking care of yourself.
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“Burden of Genius,” a documentary that came to life in Carl Kurlander’s classroom, will receive the Donate Life Hollywood Inspire Award tonight.
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In addition to his research on policy and wheelchair access, Mark Schmeler recently joined the City-County Task Force on Disability to study unconscious bias toward people with disabilities.