Innovation & Research

Dermody, a man with dark hair and glasses, in front of a tan background
About half of us have the genetic variants for celiac disease, but only one in about 130 people will get it. Pitt’s Terence Dermody in the Department of Pediatrics is on his way to understanding why.
Khoja and Freburger at a computer
Physical therapy professor Janet Freburger and postdoctoral associate Samannaaz Khoja are analyzing a large national data set to improve care for patients after they leave the hospital.
Matt Smith in a purple shirt in front of a dark background
Matt Smith, an associate professor of ophthalmology, is studying how the brain and visual stimuli interact in an effort to help people with conditions such as attention deficit disorder.
Machery in front of a map
The concepts of "wisdom" and "knowledge" aren't as universal as one might think. Edouard Machery of the Department of History and Philosophy of Science is co-leading a study that received a $2.6 million grant to probe cultural differences in understanding some of philosophy's core tenets.
William Federspiel
Researchers hope the device will be a bridge to transplant or recovery in children with acute and chronic lung failure, allowing the children to move around and avoid being bedridden.
X-ray of pair of lungs
Scientists at the University of Pittsburgh are investigating the causes and progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease — the third-leading cause of death in the United States — through the development of novel computational tools.
Each year, the United States experiences an extreme shortage of organ donations. Pitt researchers aim to change that.
Cui in a gray jacket and black shirt
Young adults are more susceptible to addiction, especially to drugs like cocaine. Using a new high-resolution sensor, bioengineer Xinyan Cui plans to figure out why.
Roecklein in a bright pink sweater in front of green grass
Only certain people in colder, darker climates end up with seasonal affective disorder. Kathryn Roecklein, an associate professor of psychology, thinks their internal clocks might be the key.
Frolov in front of a white board
In the race to create quantum computers, Pitt is leading an international team of universities, research centers and corporations to discover the best materials for building these speedy machines.