Innovation & Research

Pitt’s Innovation Institute reported its highest-ever numbers of startups, patents and invention disclosures as well as more than $4.3 million in precommercialization funding.
woman with brown hair smiling
Assistant professor of chemical and petroleum engineering Chris Wilmer and doctoral student Jenna Gustafson's artificial noses could eventually sniff out gas leaks or maybe even cancer. For his work on such tech, Wilmer recently won a prestigious engineering award.
David Hickton in a tan suit jacket and salmon tie
Large campuses and companies use a variety of techniques to safeguard research archives and computing grids. But for smaller colleges and organizations without the staff or budget to protect against cyber threats, learning what expertise and resources are available is key.
The Tsinghua Scholars Program brings Chinese medical school students to Pitt for two years of rigorous biomedical research training. In June, 13 of the scholars became the first from the partnership to receive their MDs or PhDs.
man in glasses
Pitt's Center for Research Computing is one of the first places in the country to access Intel's powerful new computing systems, allowing research of larger, more complex problems.
The Center for High-Performance Reconfigurable Computing researches systems that can be broken apart and reassembled, like Legos, and also withstand an extraterrestrial environment.
Finding a suitable doula — a professional who gives physical and educational support before, during and after childbirth — can be difficult, said Pitt Graduate School of Public Health Student Alysia Tucker. Her prize-winning idea could make the process easier.
man using BrainPort, a device that allows people with vision impairments to "see" using their tongue
"Sight: The Story of Vision" shows a Pitt-researched device called BrainPort — a set of glasses and a lollipop-like combo that allows people with vision impairments the ability to "see" through touch.
Scars of Independence book cover
Holger Hoock, British Empire specialist and Pitt history professor, takes an unvarnished look at the violent history of the American Revolution — a theme rarely examined in the heroic stories of the War of Independence.
Vignali smiling
The discovery shows that the immune system can be tweaked in order to find and destroy cancer cells more effectively.