coronavirus

A Zoom call with eight visible participants
If you missed yesterday’s panel discussion on rolling out a vaccine for COVID-19, watch the recording here, or read highlights from a wide-ranging discussion.
A man in a light blue shirt leaning against a reflective surface
Pitt’s Jonas Salk Chair for Vaccine Research explains why we need multiple candidate vaccines, what’s special about SARS-CoV-2 and why he’s hopeful about the future.
A man in a white shirt
When Jonas Salk and his Pitt team, supported by March of Dimes, tackled the polio pandemic, they came up with creative ways to make and distribute the vaccine. Dr. Rahul Gupta of March of Dimes explains why that sort of approach is needed to eradicate COVID-19 today.
A man in a gray-brown jacket and a light collared shirt and dark tie
At Pitt, the MiGEL Lab and its robot liquid handler play a major role in processing surveillance testing samples. Learn how samples are pooled, tested and sequenced to help in the battle against COVID-19.
A man in a dark shirt with headphones in, on a video chat
Peter Salk was 11 years old when a University of Pittsburgh team led by his father, the late Jonas Salk, created the inactivated poliovirus vaccine. Today, at 76, he’s back in the spotlight as researchers around the world race to develop new vaccines to stem the COVID-19 pandemic.
A Zoom call with two visible participants
Hari Sastry, senior vice chancellor and Chief Financial Officer—and this year’s campaign chair—discussed public health, economic and racial justice crises the nation is facing with Bobbi Watt Geer, president and CEO of the United Way of Southwestern Pennsylvania.
A police officer stands on a sidewalk, speaking to a person in a face mask in a white shirt and black shorts
As the Pitt Police remain vigilant throughout the pandemic, they respond to requests for transparency and more frequent communication with students. Join them in an Oct. 15 town hall.
A person walks alone on a sidewalk in foggy weather beneath street lamps
As Americans continue to social distance, conditions such as seasonal affective disorder could make winter especially hard, says psychology’s Kathryn Roecklein. Read about her work and her tips for taking care of yourself.
two young women indoors
Pitt roommates Melanie Dong and Sophie Becker ere close contacts of someone who tested positive for COVID-19, so they quarantined in their residence hall room. They want their peers to know it’s less intimidating than you might think—and the snacks are plentiful.
A person holds a smartphone up in front of a street
In September, the state released an app that anonymously identifies and alerts users of potential COVID-19 exposures. The more people who use it, the more effective it becomes.