Innovation & Research

A man in blue scrubs standing by a helicopter
Diagnosing a heart attack can be difficult, especially for prehospital emergency personnel. Using computer modeling, a team led by nursing’s Salah Al-Zaiti identified 37% more heart attacks in a study published in Nature Communications.
A earbud in a woman's left ear
Native English speakers often have trouble with tonal languages like Chinese. A new study showed that vagus nerve stimulation allowed research participants to pick up some Mandarin tones more quickly.
a man in a longsleeve shirt and jeans sitting outside with his hands on his face and his eyes closed
New research published in Preventive Medicine shows men who subscribe to strong gender norms are more likely to harm themselves and others.
Two people at a table with a tablet in front of them
A new report from Pitt’s National Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Family Support has found that caregivers of all ages are facing increased worry, mental health issues and financial stress. The center also offers resources to help.
Arthur Kosowsky in a blue checkered shirt
A multinational team including Professor Arthur Kosowsky, graduate student Yilun Guan and alum Simone Aiola from the Department of Physics and Astronomy is making progress toward solving mysteries of the universe.
A woman in a pink shirt with a prosthetic limb, next to a man in a light blue shirt
A new study from the Rehab Neural Engineering Labs created the illusion of sensations in missing limbs. See how the technology works.
Roc wearing a blue Pitt t-shirt
Proceeds from a new Pitt Athletics T-shirt are supporting the Center for Vaccine Research in its work developing a COVID-19 vaccine to emerge “Over Fate and Foe Victorious.”
vials and a syringe
Hundreds of people in Western Pennsylvania will have the opportunity to participate in clinical research trials for vaccines against the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, UPMC and the University of Pittsburgh announced today.
Robin Brooks in a pink suit jacket
Robin Brooks, assistant professor of Africana Studies, is co-editing a journal issue that looks at protests, violence and COVID-19 through the lens of Black female literary giants. Members of the Pitt community and beyond are encouraged to submit work for the issue by July 31.
Utibe Essien in a green bow tie and dark blue jacket
When it comes to data on COVID-19, there are disparities between what information states are recording and reporting—especially when it comes to race. Utibe Essien, an assistant professor in the School of Medicine, explains why racial data is so important to track.